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Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcar / M-105 / M-110 / M-160

 

fairchildc119


During 1947 Fairchild developed an improved version of the C-82, the XC-82B prototype being a conversion from a production C-82A. It differed primarily by having the flight deck resited into the nose of the aircraft and the installation of 1976kW Pratt & Whitney R-4360-4 Wasp Major 28-cylinder radial engines.


The M.105 was designated XC.119A


Following service tests the M.110 was ordered into production as the C-119B Flying Boxcar (55 built), these having the fuselage widened by 0.36m, structural strengthening for operation at higher gross weights, and more powerful R-4360-20 engines, and M.110 / C.119C.


Accommodating up to 62 paratroops, and with increased cargo capacity, the C-119s serviced during operations in Korea and Vietnam. C-119s also served with the air forces of Belgium, Brazil, Ethiopia, India, Italy, Nationalist China and South Vietnam, many supplied under the Military Assistance Program.

 

Fairchild-C119F

C-119F

 

The Fairchild AC-119G 'Shadow' and AC119K 'Stinger' gunships were a stop-gap replacement for the AC-47 as there were not enough spare C-130s around for conversion at the time, under the AC-130 Gunship 2 programme.

 

The AC- 119G was armed with four 7.62mm minigun pods and used for the support of troops in contact with the enemy and for airbase defence. It was about 25 per cent more effective than the AC-47. The AC119K, with its additional pair of underwing jet pods and improved armament in the shape of two 20mm cannon to supplement the four miniguns, was used exclusively in the truck-hunting role over the Ho Chi Minh Trail. The first AC-119G 'Shadow' squadron arrived in Vietnam in November 1968 and the first AC-119K 'Stinger' squadron a year later in November 1969.

 

In addition, some surplus military aircraft, both C-82s and C-119s, were acquired by civil operators.


The M.160 was designated C.119H. The C-119H was an extensively redesigned version of the C-119 Packet with 2 x 3500 h. p. Wright Turbo-Cyclones, increased wing and tailplane span, and all fuel carried in external underwing tanks. Payload increased to 27,200 lb. No production order.

 

Fair-C119H
C-119H Skyvan

 

In the early 1950s, the number of Fairchild employees reached approximately 10,000 who built 1112 C-119s between 1948 and 1952.

 

In 1961 Steward-Davis Inc. of Long Beach, California, developed a Jet-Pak conversion for C-119 aircraft. This involved the installation of a 1542kg thrust Westinghouse J34-WE-36 turbojet engine in a specially-developed nacelle mounted on the upper surface of the wing centre-section. At least 26 Indian Air Force C-119s had a more powerful HAL-built Orpheus jet pod to enable them to operate with greater payloads under 'hot and high' conditions.

 

Gallery

 

C-119F
Engines: 2xWright R3350-85WA, 3350 h.p.  
Wingspan: 109 ft. 3 in.
Length: 86 ft. 6 in.
Loaded weight: 72,800 lb
Max. speed: 270 m.p.h.
Ceiling: 22,000 ft.
Typical range: 2,300 miles at 205 m.p.h.
Crew: 4
Passenger capacity: 42-78.


C-119G
Engines; 2 x Wright R-3350-85, 2610kW
Max take-off weight; 33747 kg / 74400 lb
Empty weight; 18136 kg / 39983 lb
Wingspan; 33.3 m / 109 ft 3 in
Length; 26.37 m / 86 ft 6 in
Height; 8.0 m / 26 ft 3 in
Wing area; 134.43 sq.m / 1446.99 sq ft
Max. speed; 470 km/h / 292 mph
Cruise speed; 322 km/h / 200 mph
Ceiling; 7300 m / 23950 ft
Range w/max.fuel; 3669 km / 2280 miles
Crew; 5

 

C-119H Skyvan
Engines: 2 x 3500 h. p. Wright Turbo-Cyclone
Span: 148 ft
Weight: 85,900 lb
Cruising Speed: 190 mph
Payload: 27,200 lb

 

Fair-C119F-ld

C-119F

 

 

 


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