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BAe 146

bae146
BAe 146


Hawker Siddeley announced their plans for a short-range, quiet airliner powered by four small turbo-fans in August 1973, the 146. But, with the economic recession in Britain that fol-lowed shortly after, the HS. 146 project became “unjusti-fiable” and was dropped. It was re-launched five years later when Hawker Siddley became British Aerospace (BAe).

Design of the BAe-146 included 15 rows of five-abreast seating, and it was powered by four Textron Lycoming ALF502R-5 high bypass turbofan engines of 6,970 lbs of thrust.

The British Aerospace 146 first flew at Hatfield on 3 September 1981, flown by chief test pilot Michael Goodfellow and Peter Sedgwick, and two flight test observers. At the time of the first flight, which lasted 95 minutes, BAe reported that it had 35 aircraft "earmarked for customers".

The -200 development production model flew on 1 Au-gust 1982. The main point of difference between the -200 and the-100 was the increased fuselage length of the -200 by 2.40m to 28.60m. The type was granted certifi-cation on 4 February 1983, and production went ahead, with assembly of the BAe-146 beginning at Hartford and later expanding to Woodford.

Annual production of the airliner reached 40 aircraft, and one of the first operators of the type was Dan-Air in Britain, which began operations with it in May 1983.
QT Quiet Trader and QC convertible versions with side-opening freight doors were also available. The QT suffix under-lines a marketing ploy; "Quiet Trader”. The -200QT combines the wide door introduced on the freighter versions with interior trim appropriate to the passenger role and has a within one hour turnaround between roles; providing either 94 seats or room for six freight pallets.

The prototype QC had made its debut at the 1989 Paris Air Show. With a strengthened floor that enable pallets of up to 4000 lbs (1.815 tonnes) providing a possible gross payload of 10.05 tonnes to be shifted, with a 42.184tonne MAUW permitted.

The name Statesman refers to VIP-furnished variants for military or civil customers.

A further development, the BAe 146-300, made its first flight on 1 May 1987 and certification was granted on 6 September 1988. This had its fuselage lengthened again to 30.99m, seating around 90 passengers five abreast, and an upgraded “glass” cockpit, but the power plant remained the same.

Late in 1990, BAe offered the first of an improved series called the RJ70, and this was followed over the next two years with the RJ80, the RJ85 and, in May 1992, the RJ100. The RJ-100 (G-IRJX) first flying on 23 Sept 2001. However, the RJX programme was eventually closed, marking the end of commercial jet airliner production in Britain. In all, a total of 380 BAe-146s were produced and the type has been in worldwide service.

BAe 146-100
Engines: Four Avco Lycoming ALF 502R-3 turbofans, 6,700 lb st (3 040 kgp) for take-off.
Fuel capacity: 2,540 Imp gal (11540 lt)
Optional fuel: 300 Imp gal (1364 lt)
Design Vmo/Mmo, 310 kts (574 km/h)
CAS, M0.70 above 22,000 ft (6 705 in)
Typical high cruise speed, 419 kts (775 km/h)
Still air range with basic 82-pax payload, 730 nm (1352 km)
Range with max payload and std fuel, 510 nm (946 km)
Range with max payload and increased gross weight 1,100 nm (2037 km)
Range with optional increased tankage, 1,550 nm (2871 km) with 13,000 lb (5 900 kg) payload
Balanced take-off field length, 3,600 ft (1097 m), ISA at sea level.
Typical operating weight empty, 45,570 lb (20 670 kg)
Max take-off weight, 74,600 lb (33840 kg)
Optional (-00RR) increased gross weight version, 80,750 lb (36628 kg)
Max landing weight, 71,850 lb (32590 kg)
Max zero fuel weight, 63,250 lb (28 690 kg).
Span, 86 ft 5 in (26,34 m)
Length, 85 ft 10 in (26,16 m)
Height, 28 ft 3 in (8,61 m)
Gross wing area, 832 sq ft (77,3 sq.m)
Aspect ratio, 8.97:1
Sweepback, 15 deg at quarter chord
Undercarriage track, 15 ft 6 in (4,72 m)
Wheelbase, 33 ft 11 in (10,1 m)
Flight crew: two
Max seating, one-class, 93 pax six abreast at 29-in (74-cm) pitch
Standard seating, 82 at 33-in (84-cm) pitch
Underfloor baggage/cargo compartments volumes 258 cu ft (7,30 cu.m) front / 242 cu ft (6,85 cu.m) rear

BAe 146-200

Engines: Four Avco Lycoming ALF 502R-3 turbofans, 6,700 lb st (3 040 kgp) for take-off.
Fuel capacity, 2,540 Imp gal (11540 lt)
Optional fuel 300 Imp gal (1364 lt)
Design VMO/MMO, 300 kts (557 km/h)
CAS, 100M = 0. 70 above 23,750 ft (7 240 m)
Typical high cruise speed, 419 kts (775 km/h)
Sill-air range with basic pax payload, 1200 nm (2 223 km)
Range with max payload and std fuel, 1,080 nm (2 000 km)
Range optional fuel and 19,000-1b (8 618-k.g) payload, 1380 nm (2 556 km)
Balanced take-off field length, ISA at sea level, 5,000 ft (1520 m)
Typical operating weight empty, 45,570 lb (20 670 kg)
Max take-off, 88,250 lb (40030 kg)
Max landing weight, 77,000 lb (34927 kg)
Max zero fuel weight, 69,250 lb (31411 kg)
Span, 86 ft 5 in (26,34 m)
Length, 93 ft 8 in (28,55 m)
Height, 28 ft 3 in (8,61 m)
Gross wing area, 832 sq ft (77,3 cu.m)
Aspect ratio, 8.97:1
Sweepback, 15 deg at quarter chord
Undercarriage track, 15 ft 6 in (4,72 m)
Wheelbase, 36 ft 9 in (11,20 m)
Flight crew: two
Max seating, one-class, 109 pax six abreast at 29-in (74-cm) pitch
Standard seating, 100 at 33-in (84cm) pitch.
Underfloor baggage/cargo capacity, 660 cu ft (18,69 cu.m).

BAe 146-200 II-QC
Engines: 4 x Avco Lycoming ALF502R-5, 6970 lb thrust.
MAUW: 42.184 tonne.

BAe 146 III
Engines: 4 x Textron Lycoming LF507, 7000 lb thrust.

 

 


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