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AVE (Advanced Vehicle Engineers Inc.) Mizar
 
avemizar
 
The Flight Module approach was re­vived by two Cali­fornians, Henry Smolinski and Harold Blake, founded Advanced Vehicle Engineers Inc in 1971 to design and build a flying car. AVE combined a standard US production automobile, a Ford Pinto, with the wings, tail and rear engine of Cessna's push‑pull Skymaster aircraft as the Mizar.
 
The Pinto was exten­sively modified, so that its steering wheel not only steered on the ground, but operated the ailerons and elevators. A pair of retractable rudder pedals fitted beneath the fur‑trimmed dash­board, which had a full panel of flight in­struments and avionics alongside the usual Detroit fittings.
 
AVEMizar-pit
 
Self‑locking high‑strength steel pins and tracking attached the flying surfaces to the car. Buyers were to be offered a choice of three modules with 235‑, 260- or 300‑hp engines, ranging in price from $12,319 to $22,974, Plus $5974 for the Pinto, whitewall tires included. And if you were not a Ford fan, you could have a modi­fied Chevrolet or Pontiac.
 
AVE's Mizar was surely the easiest air­craft ever to manoeuvre on the ground: you just shifted the automatic transmission to 'Drive' and away you went. For take‑off, the road drive and propeller could be used together for a swift departure, or so went the theory. In practice the Mizar per­formed miserably with a 210‑hp engine. The powerplant failed on its first flight and Smolinski and Blake had to drive back to their airfield.
 
AVEMizar-eng
 
Towards the end of 1973 car and aircraft went their separate ways just after take‑off, killing the two inventors and their project.
 
AVEMizar-2
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


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