Main Menu

Waterman Whatsit

water-what

Waldo D. Waterman of Santa Monica, California, produced in 1934 design for a two-seat tailless monoplane as a simple private aircraft.
 
Waldo D. Waterman of Santa Monica, California, produced in 1931 a design for a two-seat tailless monoplane as a simple private aircraft.With a 15° swept-back conventional wing with tip rudders, mounting a fuselage nacelle; front elevator, a front boom featured a trim feature—two small machinists' vises that could be slid to positions of advantage and then tightened.
With a tricycle gear with steerable nose wheel, this was the first airplane to be equipped with "elevon" control.
 
Water-What-01
 
Waterman spent several days taxiing around the field, feeling out the plane's characteristics, then finally tried a faster taxi down the runway, gradually advancing the throttle. On the threshold of take-off, the front wheel dropped into a gopher hole, the doors flew off their hinges, and the "Whatsit" flew at minimal altitude for about 30 feet before coming to a brutal halt. The first actual "flying wing" monoplane was rebuilt to enter a 1933 safety plane competition, winning one of the only two awards out of 30 entries.
 
Water-What-02
 
Powered by a 100hp Kinner K-5 pusher engine, the two place Whatsit, registered NX12272 became known as Arrowplane and led to the 1937 version.
 
 Water-What-03
 
 Water-What-04

 

 

 


Copyright © 2018 all-aero. All Rights Reserved.
Joomla! is Free Software released under the GNU General Public License.