Main Menu

Letov Š.6 / Š.16 / SB-16 / Š.17 / Š.116 / Š.216 / Š.316 / Š.416 / Š.516 / Š.616 / Š.716 / Š.816 / Š.916

letovs16

 

The Letov Š.6 two-seat biplane bomber, 1923, 1 x 255 kW 6-cyl Maybach IVa, 35 built (led to Š-16 and civil Š-19). An all metal- and welded steel-tube-airframe, fabric-covered, metal sheet plate cowling.
 
S-6
 
The Letov S-6 biplane began production in 1923.

 

The S-16 was in production from 1926.
 
Letov-S16-02
 
W/Cdr Jaroslav Skalka made a Tokyo-bound long-distance flight via Moscow, Kazan, Omsk, Chita and Hedzhu in 1927 in an S-16. Heading for Czechoslovakia, he and his flight mechanic Taufer crashed in Siberia and took the plane`s rudder home.

 

The Š.16 long-range reconnaissance and light bomber biplane, built from 1927 to 1929 for Czechoslavakia, Latvia and Turkey. Power was by a 450 hp W-12 Lorraine Dietrich 12E.
Variants included:
Š.16B (or SB-16), bomber variant, lowered rear fuselage decking, 1928
Š.16L (22 for Latvia as the 'C1', HS 8Fb)
Š.16J (floatplane version for Yugoslavia)
Š.16T (16 for Turkey, to be followed by unrealized licenced S-616)

Š.116 bomber, 1928, 1 x 500 hp 6-cyl Skoda L, Handley-Page slots on wings
Š.216 bomber, 1928, 1 x 480 hp 9-cyl Walter Jupiter (or Gnome-Rhone Jupiter VIII), 3 built
Š.316 bomber, 1931, SB-16 conversions with 1 x V-12 Hispano Suiza 12Lb, 3 built
Š.416 bomber, 1929, a S-16 conversion with 1 x 515 hp [?]-cyl Breitfeld & Danek DL
Š.516 bomber, 1930, 1 x 800 hp W-12 Praga Asso 9-W, 2 built (failed competitior to Aero A-100, later record attempt aircraft with spats fitted)
Š.616 bomber, 1 x 650 hp V-12 Hispano-Suiza 12Nbr (4-bladed propeller), 12 built
Š.716 bomber
Š.816 bomber, 1932, V-12 Praga ESV engine
Š.916 attack aircraft

The Letov Š.17 was the third prototype S-16 fitted with a V-12 Breitfeld-Danek (Praga) BD-500 engine in 1929.

 

Letov-S16-03


These aircraft were the first Latvian air force aircraft of metal construction, and some of them continued in service right up to the Soviet occupation. In September, 1939 the Letovs appeared on the rosters of the the 5th Recon Squadron (Riga) and the 7th Recon Squadron (Krustpils).
When the aircraft first arrived in Latvia they bore the manufacturer's assigned numbers L1 - L22 (L16 was, mysteriously, skipped). The latvians renumbered them according to the air force serial number system.
The aircraft were accepted, in Czechoslovakia, by Basko and Trejs, and they were sent in two batches - nine of them on Sept.10, 1927 and twelve on Jan.15, 1929. One of the first to fly the newly purchased aircraft was Sgt. Launics, who subsequently became a specialized instructor on this type of aircraft.
When used as a light bomber, the S.16 was capable of carrying 300-600 kg of bombs.
In 1930 parachutes come into use in the Latvian Air Force, but pilots flying the Letovs tend not to wear them because the cockpits did not easily accommodate the extra bulk.
In 1935, when the Aviation Division tried to standardize the description of aircraft types by assigning codes according to their function, the Letovs were coded as "C1".
February 1, 1928 - one of the Letovs (pilot: Arvids Kibers) makes a forced landing near Krustpils.
February 25, 1928 - one of the Letovs makes a forced landing near Dzerbene.
During 1940 (Soviet occupation), the surviving Letovs (which had been evacuated to Ramava and Bisumuiza) are gathered together and stored at the Provodnik warehouse, where they remained throughout the first Soviet occupation and the German occupation as well.
August 12, 1931 - fatal crash at Daugavpils (Janis Zeile, Nikolajs Ritenbergs)
August 26, 1928 - fatal crash near Cesis. Three aviators (Arvids Kiberis, Sergejs Bloms, Julijs Metums) lost.

Latvian service:

#17K (17)
Taken on charge in late 1927 or early 1928. Assigned to the 6th Squadron where it remained until at least Oct.1938, probably longer.

#18K
Taken on charge in late 1927 or early 1928. Assigned to the 6th Squadron.
Sept. 1929 - Participated in the goodwill flight to Lithuania and Poland. (Basko and Eglitis)
1936 - appears on the roster of the 7th Squadron.
June 15, 1937 - crash
1938 - appears on the roster of the 5th Squadron.

#19K (19)
Taken on charge in late 1927 or early 1928.
June, 1930 - on the roster of the 7th (Long-range Reconnaissance) Squadron.
November 26, 1936 - crash
1937, 1938 - appears on the roster of a training unit.
June 1, 1940 - appears on the roster of the 2nd Squadron.

#21
Taken on charge in late 1927 or early 1928.
Dec.1936 - appears on the roster of the 4th Squadron.
May 10, 1937 - undergoes repairs (5th Squadron)
Dec.1937 - appears on the roster of the 5th Squadron.

#23
Taken on charge in late 1927 or early 1928.
1930 - on the roster of the 7th (Long-range Reconnaissance) Squadron.
1936, 1937 and 1938 - appears on the roster of the 6th Squadron.

#24
Taken on charge in late 1927 or early 1928.

#25
Taken on charge in late 1927 or early 1928.
April 1930 - on the roster of the 7th (Long-range Reconnaissance) Squadron.
Jan - July 1937 - appears on the roster of a training unit, then returned to the 7th Squadron.
Oct.1938 - appears on the roster of the 7th Squadron.

#27
Taken on charge in late 1927 or early 1928.
April 1930 - appears on the roster of a training unit.
June 1934 - undergoes an overhaul.
June 1935 - appears on the roster of a training unit.
Dec. 1936 - appears on the roster of the 4th Squadron.
May 1937 - appears on the roster of the 5th Squadron.

#28
Taken on charge in late 1927 or early 1928.
Jan.1936 - undergoes an overhaul.
June 1937 - appears on the roster of the 5th Squadron.
July, August 1937 - appears on the roster of a training unit.

#42
Taken on charge in late 1927 or early 1928.
May 1935 - undergoes an overhaul.
April 1930 - on the roster of the 7th (Long-range Reconnaissance) Squadron.
Dec.1936 - appears on the roster of the 7th Squadron.

#48
Taken on charge in late 1927 or early 1928.
July 18, 1929 - flown by Nikolajs Bulmanis.
1936, 1937 - appears on the roster of the 7th Squadron.
June 1940 - appears on the 2nd Squadron roster.

#51
Taken on charge in late 1927 or early 1928.
March 1936 - appears on the roster of the 6th Squadron.

#52
Taken on charge in late 1927 or early 1928.
December 13, 1929 - fatal crash near Krustpils (Pauls Rucelis, Egons Jirgensons)
In June of 1937 Letov #52 reappears, now on the roster of the 6th Squadron. Considering the total destruction in the 1929 crash this must be either a reporting error or the serial number was reassigned.

#53
Taken on charge in late 1927 or early 1928.
1936, 1937, 1938 - appears on the roster of the 6th (Reconnaissance) Squadron.

#54
Taken on charge in late 1927 or early 1928.
Sept 11, 1937 - repaired
Oct. 1938 - appears on the roster of the 5th (Reconnaissance) Squadron.

#55K (55)
Taken on charge in late 1927 or early 1928.
August 30 - Sept. 7, 1930 - Participated in the goodwill flight around Europe (Vilis Munters, Alfreds Linins)
June 1937 - appears on the roster of the 5th Squadron.
April, 1938 - undergoes an overhaul.

#56
Taken on charge in late 1927 or early 1928.
June 1937 - appears on the roster of the 5th Squadron.
October 1938 - appears on the roster of the 5th (Reconnaissance) Squadron.
March 1940 - appears on the roster of the 7th Squadron.

#57 / #57K
Taken on charge in late 1927 or early 1928.
Sept. 1929 - Participated in the goodwill flight to Lithuania and Poland. (Kandis and Ritenbergs)
April 1930 - appears on the roster of the 7th (Long-Range Reconnaissance) Squadron.
August 30 - Sept. 7, 1930 - Participated in the goodwill flight around Europe (Janis Pagrods, Nikolajs Kaneps)
December 1936 - appears on the roster of the 6th Squadron.
December 1937 - appears on the roster of the 5th Squadron
March 1940 - appears on the roster of the 7th Squadron.

#58 / #58K
Taken on charge in late 1927 or early 1928.
April 1930 - appears on the roster of the 7th (Long-Range Reconnaissance) Squadron.
1936, 1937, 1938 - appears on the roster of the 7th Squadron.
June 1940 - appears on the roster of the 2nd Squadron.

#59 / #59K
Taken on charge in late 1927 or early 1928.
Sept. 1929 - Participated in the goodwill flight to Lithuania and Poland. (Trejs and Jere)
April 1930 - appears on the roster of the 7th (Long-Range Reconnaissance) Squadron.
August 30 - Sept. 7, 1930 - Participated in the goodwill flight around Europe (Eriks Mellups, J.Indans)
June 1937 - appears on the roster of the 7th Squadron.
June 1940 - appears on the roster of the 2nd Squadron.


Specifications:

 

S-6
Engine: Maybach Mb-IV, 240 hp
Wingspan: 15.69 m
Length: 8.85 m
Wing area: 42.97 sqm
Maximum speed: 186 kph
Climb to 5000m: 31 min 30 sec.
Range: 780 km

 

S-16
Engine: Lorraine Dietrich, 450 hp
Wingspan: 15.30 m
Length: 10.22 m
Empty weight: 1400 kg
Max. speed: 230 kph
Service ceiling: 6500 m
Endurance: 5 hrs 30 min 
Armament: one synchronized and a twin-one firing rearwards for an observer.
Payload: up to 1000 kg,

 

Š.16B / SB-16

Š.16J

Š.16L
Engine: 450-hp Hispano Suiza HS 8Fb.
Length: 10.22 m
Wing Span: 15.3 m
Height:
Max Speed: 230 km/hr
Range: 900 km
Maximum Ceiling: 7,000 m
Known Serial Numbers: 8, 8K, 10, 15K, 17K, 18K, 21, 23, 23K, 24, 25, 27, 28, 42, 47, 48, 51, 52, 53, 54, 57K, 58K, 59K (a total of 21 aircraft)

Š.16J
Undercarriage: floats

Š.16T

Š.17
Engine: V-12 Breitfeld-Danek (Praga) BD-500

Š.116
Engine: 1 x 500 hp 6-cyl Skoda L

Š.216
Engine: 1 x 480 hp 9-cyl Walter Jupiter (or Gnome-Rhone Jupiter VIII)

Š.316
Engine: 1 x V-12 Hispano Suiza 12Lb

Š.416
Engine: 1 x 515 hp Breitfeld & Danek DL

Š.516
Engine: 1 x 800 hp W-12 Praga Asso 9-W

Š.616

Engine: 1 x 650 hp V-12 Hispano-Suiza 12Nbr
Prop: 4-bladed

Š.716

Š.816
Engine: V-12 Praga ESV

Š.916
Attack aircraft.

 

 


Copyright © 2017 all-aero. All Rights Reserved.
Joomla! is Free Software released under the GNU General Public License.