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de Havilland Aeronautical Technical School
 
The de Havilland Aeronautical Technical School was founded in 1928, initially to provide owners of de Havilland Moth aircraft with technical maintenance skills and to enhance de Havilland's apprenticeship scheme. From 1933, the students designed aircraft, and the best of these were built.
 
The Technical School was started at Edgware, London, England by Geoffrey de Havilland, founder of the de Havilland aircraft company, together with Frank Hearle. In 1934, the School moved to Hatfield, Hertfordshire, following the establishment of Hatfield Aerodrome there. The curriculum widened to cover the design, manufacture, and operation of aircraft in general. The instructors were engineers from the de Havilland company.

The drawings for the first one were done by a Dutch student, Juste van Hattum who entitled it the T.K.1, with T.K. for "Tekniese Kollege". Three T.K. aircraft were built and flown, the T.K.1, the T.K.2, and the T.K.4. They did not receive DH style type numbers.

As school projects 4 aircraft were built by the students.
The de Havilland T.K. 1
The de Havilland T.K. 2
The de Havilland T.K. 4
The de Havilland T.K. 5
 
In 1940, the School was bombed by the Germans in a World War II raid and it was forced to move to Welwyn Garden City nearby. It then transferred to Salisbury Hall in 1941, now the location of the de Havilland Aircraft Heritage Centre. During 1947–48, the School was moved to Astwick Manor, to the northeast of Hatfield Aerodrome.

In 1963, the de Havilland company became part of Hawker Siddeley Aviation and the School was renamed to become the Hawker Siddeley Aviation (Hatfield) Apprentice Training School in 1965. Later it became part of Hatfield Polytechnic and then the College Lane campus of the University of Hertfordshire.

There were also associated schools at Broughton, Christchurch, Lostock, and Portsmouth.
 
 
 
 


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